Questions People Asks From Hackers ??

Q: How do I tell if I am already a hacker?
Q: Will you teach me how to hack?
Q: How can I get started, then?
Q: When do you have to start? Is it too late for me to learn?
Q: How long will it take me to learn to hack?
Q: Would you help me to crack a system, or teach me how to crack?
Q: How can I get the password for someone else’s account?
Q: How can I break into/read/monitor someone else’s email?
Q: How can I steal channel op privileges on IRC?
Q: I’ve been cracked. Will you help me fend off further attacks?
Q: I’m having problems with my Windows software. Will you help me?
Q: Where can I find some real hackers to talk with?
Q: Can you recommend useful books about hacking-related subjects?
Q: Do I need to be good at math to become a hacker?
Q: What language should I learn first?
Q: Do I need to hate and bash Microsoft?
Q: But won’t open-source software leave programmers unable to make a living?
Q: Where can I get a free Unix?

Q:- How do I tell if I am already a hacker?
A:- Ask yourself the following three questions:-
  1. Do you speak code, fluently?
  2. Do you identify with the goals and values of the hacker community?
  3. Has a well-established member of the hacker community ever called
    you a hacker?
If you can answer yes to all three of these questions, you are already a
hacker.

Q:- Will you teach me how to hack?
A:- We don’t have the time and energy to do this as we are busy.  Hacking is an attitude and skill you basically have to teach yourself. You’ll find that while real hackers want to help you, they won’t respect you if you beg to be spoon-fed everything they know.
Learn a few things first. Show that you’re trying, that you’re capable of learning on your own. Then go to the hackers you meet with specific questions

Q:- How can I get started, then?
A:- The best way for you to get started would probably be to go to a LUG (Linux user group) meeting. You can find such groups on the LDP General Linux Information Page; there is probably one near you, possibly associated with a college or university. LUG members will probably give you a Linux if you ask, and will certainly help you install one and get started.

Q:- When do you have to start? Is it too late for me to learn?
A:- Any age at which you are motivated to start is a good age. Most people seem to get interested between ages 15 and 20, but I know of exceptions in both direction

Q:- How long will it take me to learn to hack?
A:- That depends on how talented you are and how hard you work at it. Most people who try can acquire a respectable skill set in eighteen months to two years, if they concentrate. Don’t think it ends there, though; in hacking (as in many other fields) it takes about ten years to achieve mastery. And if you are a real hacker, you will spend the rest of your life learning and perfecting your craft.


Q:- Would you help me to crack a system, or teach me how to crack?
A:- No. Anyone who can still ask such a question after reading this FAQ is too
stupid to be educable even if I had the time for tutoring. Any emailed
requests of this kind that I get will be ignored or answered with extreme
rudeness.

Q:- How can I get the password for someone else’s account?
A:- This is cracking. Go away, idiot.

Q:- How can I break into/read/monitor someone else’s email?
A:- This is cracking. Get lost, moron.

Q:- How can I steal channel op privileges on IRC?
A:- This is cracking. Begone, cretin.

Q:- I’ve been cracked. Will you help me fend off further attacks?
A:- No. Every time We’ve been asked this question so far, it’s been from some poor sap running Microsoft Windows. It is not possible to effectively secure Windows systems against crack attacks; the code and architecture simply have too many flaws, which makes securing Windows like trying to bail out a boat with a sieve. The only reliable prevention starts with switching to Linux or some other operating system that is designed to at least be capable of security.

Q:- I’m having problems with my Windows software. Will you help me?
A:- Yes. Go to a DOS prompt and type “format c:”. Any problems you are
experiencing will cease within a few minutes.


Q:- Where can I find some real hackers to talk with?
A:- The best way is to find a Unix or Linux user’s group local to you and go to their meetings (you can find links to several lists of user groups on the LDP site at ibiblio).
(I used to say here that you wouldn’t find any real hackers on IRC, but I’m given to understand this is changing. Apparently some real hacker communities, attached to things like GIMP and Perl, have IRC channels now.)


Q:- Can you recommend useful books about hacking-related subjects?
A:- I maintain a Linux Reading List HOWTO that you may find helpful. The Loginataka may also be interesting. For an introduction to Python, see the introductory materials on the Python site.

Q:- Do I need to be good at math to become a hacker?
A:- No. Hacking uses very little formal mathematics or arithmetic. In particular, you won’t usually need trigonometry, calculus or analysis (there are exceptions to this in a handful of specific application areas like 3-D computer graphics). Knowing some formal logic and Boolean algebra is good. Some grounding in finite mathematics can be helpful.

Q:- What language should I learn first?
A:- XHTML  if you don’t already know it. There are a lot of glossy, hype-intensive bad HTML books out there, and distressingly few good ones. The one I like best is HTML: The Definitive Guide.
But HTML is not a full programming language. When you’re ready to start programming, I would recommend starting with Python. You will hear a lot of people recommending Perl, and Perl is still more popular than Python, but it’s harder to learn and (in my opinion) less well designed.
C is really important, but it’s also much more difficult than either Python
or Perl. Don’t try to learn it first.
Windows users, do not settle for Visual Basic. It will teach you bad habits,
and it’s not portable off Windows. Avoid.


Q:- Do I need to hate and bash Microsoft?
A:- No, you don’t. Not that Microsoft isn’t loathsome, but there was a hacker culture long before Microsoft and there will still be one long after Microsoft is history. Any energy you spend hating Microsoft would be
better spent on loving your craft. Write good code — that will bash Microsoft quite sufficiently without polluting your karma.


Q:- But won’t open-source software leave programmers unable to make a
living?
A:- This seems unlikely — so far, the open-source software industry seems to
be creating jobs rather than taking them away. If having a program written
is a net economic gain over not having it written, a programmer will get
paid whether or not the program is going to be open-source after it’s done.
And, no matter how much “free” software gets written, there always seems
to be more demand for new and customized applications

Q:- Where can I get a free Unix?
A:- If you don’t have a Unix installed on your machine yet, elsewhere on this
page I include pointers to where to get the most commonly used free Unix.
To be a hacker you need motivation and initiative and the ability to educate
yourself. Start now…
SHARE

Milan Tomic

Hi. I’m Designer of Blog Magic. I’m CEO/Founder of ThemeXpose. I’m Creative Art Director, Web Designer, UI/UX Designer, Interaction Designer, Industrial Designer, Web Developer, Business Enthusiast, StartUp Enthusiast, Speaker, Writer and Photographer. Inspired to make things looks better.

  • Image
  • Image
  • Image
  • Image
  • Image
    Blogger Comment
    Facebook Comment

0 comments:

Post a Comment