Cyber Criminals listen to private phone calls and read text messages

The critical flaw lies in the global telecom network known as Signal System 7 that powers multiple phone carriers across the world, including AT&T and Verizon, to route calls, texts and other services to each other. Security researchers have discovered a massive security flaw that could let hackers and cybercriminals listen to private phone calls and read text messages on a potentially vast scale – no matter if the cellular networks use the latest and most advanced encryption available. NUMBER OF SECURITY FLAWS IN SS7 
SS7 or Signaling System Number 7 is a protocol suite used by most telecommunications operators throughout the world to communicate with one another when directing calls, texts and Internet data. It allows cell phone carriers to collect location information from cell phone towers and share it with each other. A United States carrier will find its customer, no matter if he or she travels to any other country.

According to the security researchers, the outdated infrastructure of the SS7 makes it very easy for hackers to hack, as it is loaded with some serious security vulnerabilities which can lead to huge invasions of privacy of the billions of cellular customers worldwide.
"The flaws discovered by the German researchers are actually functions built into SS7 for other purposes – such as keeping calls connected as users speed down highways, switching from cell tower to cell tower – that hackers can repurpose for surveillance because of the lax security on the network," the report reads.
BACKDOOR OPEN FOR HACKERS
So far, the extent of flaws exploited by hackers have not been revealed, but it is believed that using the flaws hackers can locate or redirect users' calls to themselves or anywhere in the world before forwarding to the intended recipient, listen to calls as they happen, and record hundreds of encrypted calls and texts at a time for later decryption.

No matter how much strong or advanced encryption the carriers are using, for example AT&T and Verizon use 3G and 4G networks for calls, messages, and texts sent from people within the same network, but the use of that old and insecure SS7 for sending data across networks the backdoor open for hackers.

Not just this, use of SS7 protocol also makes the potential to defraud users and cellular carriers, according to the researchers.



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Milan Tomic

Hi. I’m Designer of Blog Magic. I’m CEO/Founder of ThemeXpose. I’m Creative Art Director, Web Designer, UI/UX Designer, Interaction Designer, Industrial Designer, Web Developer, Business Enthusiast, StartUp Enthusiast, Speaker, Writer and Photographer. Inspired to make things looks better.

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